Disciplinary and Thematic Concentrations

M.A. students in Latin American studies who are interested in specific disciplines or research topics have the OPTION to apply for a disciplinary or thematic concentration. Currently students may choose from concentrations in cultural studies, gender studies, international migration, history, and sociology. Students who choose not to focus on a concentration also have the option to develop their own area of study.

In addition to the general requirements for all candidates applying for admission to the Master of Arts in Latin American studies, applicants to a concentration must submit a statement explaining their intellectual and career interests in that specific area of study. Applications from new students will be considered for the fall quarter. Current students in the Latin American studies master’s program may apply in the spring quarter of their first year.

M.A. students who were previously enrolled as undergraduates at UCSD will not be allowed to repeat courses for credit toward the concentration. In all cases there are alternatives, and those students will be expected to take other classes to fulfill the requirements.

General Concentration Requirements

To receive the master of arts in Latin American studies with a concentration, a student must

  1. Demonstrate foreign language competence in Spanish or Portuguese.
  2. Maintain a 3.0 GPA in forty units of course work (about ten courses) to be completed as follows:
    1. Complete the Latin American Studies Basic Seminar Sequence: twelve units must be taken in the required Core Seminar in Latin American Studies (LATI 200, four units), four units in approved theory seminar, and four units in approved methodology seminar.
    2. Complete sixteen units within the specifications of the concentration (as specified below). All of the concentration units must be taken at the graduate level (200 level), and a maximum of two undergraduate-level courses (100 level) may be upgraded to graduate-level 298 courses.
    3. Complete twelve units of general electives within the specification of the concentration (as specified below). At least 50 percent of the general elective units must be taken at the graduate level (200 level).
  3. Successfully complete a master’s thesis on a topic relevant to the area of concentration.

Specific Concentrations and Requirements

Cultural Studies

In addition to the Latin American Studies Core Sequence (LATI 200, One Theory Seminar, One Methods Seminar, LATI 299), a student must complete the following units as concentration course work and general electives in order to receive a Master's in Latin American Studies with a concentration in Cultural Studies:

  1. Two seminars (eight units) from the approved list of core seminars. These may be used to satisfy the theory and methodology requirements of the LAS M.A. program.
  2. Two courses (eight units) from the approved list of elective courses within the thematic specialization.
  3. Two to four elective courses (eight to sixteen units)from the general Latin American Studies approved course list. The number of electives the student must take depends on whether or not courses taken to fulfill the first requirement will also be used for the Theory or Methods requirement.

Completion of the degree is normally expected within two academic years of three quarters full-time academic work plus one summer session. Those individuals needing (a) intensive language instruction,( b) part-time employment, or (c) extensive field research for the thesis may require longer. While there is no maximum amount of time students can take to complete the program, students are only eligible to recieve Univeristy financial support for a maximum of 7 quarters.

The selection of these seminars and courses must be formally approved by the student's personal advisor.

Note: With approval from his/her advisor, students may take other seminars and courses that do not appear on the approved list, provided that the content of the work that they do is directly related to Latin American issues, topics or themes. Any course that is not on the list must be petitioned by filling out a petition form with the Latin American Studies Student Affairs Officer.

Gender Studies

In addition to the Latin American Studies Core Sequence (LATI 200, Theory Seminar, Methodology Seminar), a student must complete the following units as concentration course work and general electives in order to receive a Master's in Latin American Studies with a concentration in Gender Studies:

  1. One general theoretical course in gender studies (four units).
  2. One course in feminist theory (four units).
  3. One course focused on gender studies in Latin America (four units)
  4. One course of directed reading (298, four units), taken with a faculty member affiliated with the CGS Program, focused on a topic relevant to Latin American gender studies.
  5. General Electives: The remaining twelve units must be taken as follows: two courses from the approved list of courses on Latin America (eight units), four units of directed reading (298), and four units of independent research (299).

Completion of the degree is normally expected within two academic years of three quarters full-time academic work plus one summer session. Those individuals needing (a) intensive language instruction,( b) part-time employment, or (c) extensive field research for the thesis may require longer. While there is no maximum amount of time students can take to complete the program, students are only eligible to recieve Univeristy financial support for a maximum of 7 quarters.

Note:  With approval from his/her advisor, students may take other seminars or courses that do not appear on the approved list, provided that the content of the work that they do is directly related to Latin American issues, topics, or themes.  Any course that is not on the list must be petitioned by filling out a petition form with the Latin American Studies Student Affairs Officer.

History

In addition to the Latin American Studies Core Sequence (LATI 200, Theory Seminar, Methodology Seminar), a student must complete the following units as concentration course work and general electives in order to receive a Master's in Latin American Studies with a concentration in History:

  1. A required research seminar sequence in Latin American history (eight units)
  2. Two elective courses or seminars in Latin American history (eight units)
  3. General Electives: The remaining twelve units must be taken in departments other than the Department of History as follows: one course from the approved list of courses on Latin America (four units), four units of directed reading (298), and four units of independent research (299).

Completion of the degree is normally expected within two academic years of three quarters full-time academic work plus one summer session. Those individuals needing (a) intensive language instruction,( b) part-time employment, or (c) extensive field research for the thesis may require longer. While there is no maximum amount of time students can take to complete the program, students are only eligible to recieve Univeristy financial support for a maximum of 7 quarters.

Note:  With approval from his/her advisor, students may take other seminars and courses that do not appear on the approved list, provided that the content of the work that they do is directly related to Latin American issues, topics or themes. Any course that is not on the list must be petitioned by filling out a petition form with the Latin American Studies Student Affairs Officer.

International Migration

In addition to the Latin American Studies Core Sequence (LATI 200, Theory Seminar, Methodology Seminar), a student must complete the following units as concentration course work and general electives in order to receive a Master's in Latin American Studies with a concentration in International Migration:

  1. One course focused on economic and social factors in international migration (four units).
  2. One course focused on Immigration Policy (4 units).
  3. One course focused on Latin American international migration (four units).
  4. One course of directed reading (four units in a 298 course, focused on a topic relevant to Latin American migratory movements).
  5. General Electives: The remaining twelve units must be taken as follows: one course from the approved list of courses on Latin America (four units), four units of directed reading (298), and four units of Independent Research (299).

Completion of the degree is normally expected within two academic years of three quarters full-time academic work plus one summer session. Those individuals needing (a) intensive language instruction,( b) part-time employment, or (c) extensive field research for the thesis may require longer. While there is no maximum amount of time students can take to complete the program, students are only eligible to recieve Univeristy financial support for a maximum of 7 quarters.

Note: With approval of his/her advisor, students may take other seminars and courses that do not appear on the approved list, provided that the content of the work that they do is directly related to Laitn American issues, topics or themes. Any course that is not on the list must be petitioned by filling out a petition form with the Latin American Studies Student Affairs Officer.

Sociology

In addition to the Latin American Studies Core Sequence (LATI 200, Theory Seminar, Methodology Seminar), a student must complete the following units as concentration course work and general electives in order to receive a Master's in Latin American Studies with a concentration in Sociology:

  1. One seminar in classical sociological theory (four units).
  2. One seminar in sociological research methods (four units).
  3. One core sociological field seminar (four units).
  4. One sociology course or seminar focused on Latin America (four units).
  5. General Electives: The remaining twelve units must be taken in departments other than the Department of Sociology as follows: one course from the approved list of courses on Latin America (four units), four units of directed reading (298), and four units of independent research (299).

Completion of the degree is normally expected within two academic years of three quarters full-time academic work plus one summer session. Those individuals needing (a) intensive language instruction, (b) part-time employment, or (c) extensive field research for the thesis may require longer. While there is no maximum amount of time students can take to complete the program, students are only eligible to recieve Univeristy financial support for a maximum of 7 quarters.

Note: With approval from his/her advisor, students may take other seminars or courses that do not appear on the approved list, provided that the content of the work that they do is directly related to Latin American issues, topics, or themes. Any course that is not on the list must be petitioned by filling out a petition form with the Latin American Studies Student Affairs Officer.